Ricardo Alonzo

Ricardo started his art career in 1958, at the age of 18 when he was in the Army, stationed in Orleans, France. After two years of visiting art galleries and traveling throughout Europe, he decided to continue studying and creating art.

After discharge, he traveled to Mexico City and studied the Mexican muralists for one year.  He returned to his hometown of Chicago and was awarded a four year scholarship to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  He received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1970.  Soon after, he was given another scholarship to the University of Chicago, where he received a Master of Fine Arts degree in painting, art history and public art in 1973.

He was hired by the Comprehensive Educational Training Act(CETA) of the City of Chicago.  Under this exciting program, which lasted for 9 years, from 1970-1979, he both painted and directed young artists in the creation of a one mile long mural, which is still located on Hubbard Street.  The subject of this mural is saving our endangered species and preventing the pollution of water and air.

Also during that time in Chicago, Clipper Express Company awarded him 18 commissions to paint murals, about the same subject, on their large truck trailers.

In 1979, after the completion of the murals, he was awarded a job as a Art Specialist at Fort Huachuca, Arizona. He worked for Morale, Welfare and Recreation Art Center, both as a director and as an instructor of many art media, such as painting, photography, silver jewelry creation, drawing and ceramics, to name only a few.

Ricardo retired from this position in 2008, and still remains active in the arts.